Dozer, the bulldog

Dozer, the bulldog
Dozer: Spring training is upon us!

Backstage at Reggae on the River, 2017...

Backstage at Reggae on the River, 2017...
The author of Mark's Work

Hollyhocks

Hollyhocks
Why I grow flowers

HappyDay Farms bees are happy bees.

HappyDay Farms bees are happy bees.
Air-borne bees

HeadSodBuster and BossLady at the coast

HeadSodBuster and BossLady at the coast
Love is the greatest power.

Beauty abounds!

Beauty abounds!
Crossing the Eel River at French's Camp

If you've seen one butterfly, you've seen 'em all, said no one ever.

If you've seen one butterfly,  you've seen 'em all, said no one ever.
Butter in the fly...

July Jewels

July Jewels
Bees to the Kingdom

My souvenir from Reggae on the River, 2017

My souvenir from Reggae on the River, 2017
Something I have always wanted...

Mahlon Masling Blue

Mahlon Masling Blue
My friend and brother.

Mark's E-mail address

bellspringsmark@gmail.com

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Facebook Is Not a Test

Facebook is Not a Test
Bear with me.  I’m a kid in a toy shop, with vast unlimited games at hand.  You see, what I play with is words.  It’s an addiction, I’m afraid, and it started a long time ago, when I was about five or six.  Being the fourth of nine kids, I was always up for a little attention, not all of it of the positive nature.  Therefore, I was frequently under the parental magnifying glass, especially in the car.  
I found solace in books.  I could bury my entire self within the book covers of Little Men, or The Swiss Family Robinson, or Jules Verne’s The Mysterious Island.  My trainers found me more manageable, all through the power of words.  Arranged in certain orders, words transported me to a world of unimaginable heights.  And it didn’t cost a dime.
As I went through high school, I found that the rules of the English language seemed as easy to acquire to me as rules of baseball, only a few more.  There were unlimited games I could find within the English language, to make a 1500 piece jigsaw puzzle. seem like a knock-knock joke.  The trick was to convey my enthusiasm for the mechanics of language to students, just as I conveyed my enthusiasm for baseball.
I mean, I could post the scores of each of the games of the 2002 World Series, on front and back windows of my classroom (facing outward, of course) and everyone got so into it.  At least that was my perception. After all, I could have had signs reminding them that it was pick-up-after-you-eat, or eat-in-the-MPR, by order of KT.  They seemed to like the baseball messages a little more.
Now I have discovered face-book, which to me is the best of all worlds.  Words abound!  They’re everywhere, and I am now a part of it all.  I can carry on a conversation with Erin, overseas, as casually as texting.  I can convey information at the click of a key, and move on to the next thing.  I know this is all old news to you, but it’s still sparklers and bottle rockets for me.
If I were going to try and pinpoint the most significant feature of Facebook, it is that I have a time capsule in the form of my brain, which has thousands of hours of film footage from the hours I spent with so many of you.  I have a tricky memory, in that I can remember the names and faces of everyone of my first homeroom, and most from that point onward, even though I may struggle with what you told me last Tuesday.
And now that I have access to Facebook, I see how the transformation has occurred, from thirteen-year-olds to adults.  I see how  time has shaped and molded these individuals into what they have become, and see that they are as tight-knit now as they were when they were in school.  Words are the tool and no one worries that writing is such a pain, and we’d rather do anything than write.
Are there spelling mistakes on Facebook?  Errors in usage?  Is there always subject/verb agreement?  I wouldn’t know.  As I told Sabrina, I am deprogrammed to notice these things. I don’t know how it happened, but anyone who thinks that I am going to look down my nose, at someone who reaches out with words, because he or she has the unmitigated gall to misspell a word, had better think again.  As I said to Annie, “I spent sixteen years editing these guys’ writing; now let me just coast, please.”
And Annie monitors my tech progress, attempting to ride the roller coaster that is me, as I continue to clamber up onto the crest of the 21st century, instead of being towed along behind, like a dingy behind a yacht. What I lack in knowledge or efficiency, I make up for in enthusiasm and diligence.  It will take a while to get completely in synch with the whole process, but I am having the time of my life.
Just remember, if I post the same photo twice, or accidentally click like on my own stuff, just chalk it up to inexperience, and we’ll call it a draw on any minor irregularities when it comes to the English language.  After all, I know you know the rules; I taught them to you.  But this isn’t a test and we don’t need any number two pencils, just a desire to reach out and say, “Howdy.”

6 comments:

  1. Your enthusiasm and warmth are contagious. Connecting with former 13 year old students who are not peers can really be rewarding, heh?

    ReplyDelete
  2. To see them with their life partners and kids, celebrating life with family and friends, able to stay connected by fb, is very enjoyable. Now I can be part of it, even though I am starting to run out of time. Nothing new there.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Welcome to facebook! I enjoy connecting with old friends. I am not entirely sure I enjoy their life's play by play that some people insist on posting, but overall I like it :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's all about old friends. I am enjoying it immensely.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your post has me grinning. It's fun to see someone discovering Facebook-- I like it, too, and I also don't check for spelling and grammar! I don't mind people posting what some may say is trivial information. Those little moments are the stuff of life.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Because they all add up, just like life. Where are you, Melanie? We miss you.

    ReplyDelete