Dozer, the bulldog

Dozer, the bulldog
Dozer: Spring training is upon us!

Rockin' and rollin'

Rockin' and rollin'
The author of Mark's Work

Coleus flowers

Coleus flowers
Why I grow flowers

HappyDay Farms bees are happy bees.

HappyDay Farms bees are happy bees.
Air-borne bees

HeadSodBuster and BossLady at the coast

HeadSodBuster and BossLady at the coast
Love is the greatest power.

Beauty abounds!

Beauty abounds!
Heinz tomatoes, used for catsup

If you've seen one butterfly, you've seen 'em all, said no one ever.

If you've seen one butterfly,  you've seen 'em all, said no one ever.
Painted Lady

Fall Jewels

Fall Jewels
Praying mantis, attending services on a zinnia...

My souvenir from Reggae on the River, 2017

My souvenir from Reggae on the River, 2017
Something I have always wanted...

Mahlon Masling Blue

Mahlon Masling Blue
My friend and brother.

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Saturday, February 18, 2012

High Atop the Elephant

High Atop the Elephant
“Jojo left his home in Tucson, Arizona, for some California grass...”  McCartney/Lennon, “Get Back,” 1969
I will warn you at the outset of this post that the villagers are in a tizzy, with the  news that there is an errant elephant, rampaging in the immediate vicinity.  Recent history indicates that elephants on the loose, have been drifting closer and closer to the delicate china aisle of the FineLine Salon, an area heretofore designated as off-limits by the powers that be.  One last insignificant detail is that, though boundaries and states’ borders do not come into play in this cyber-age, the fact is that the Salon is located in California.
I have a fair amount of control over the goings-on of my blog, but there is very little even I can do, when the keepers of the tranquility and peace pen, leave their venue for parts unknown, and the thrumming drums of discontent, rumble through the neighborhood, unable to contain themselves any longer. 
This particular elephant, like the fabled elephant visited by the six blind men, has a particularly checkered past, and is viewed by different people, from different parts of our great nation, as either a rabid leviathan, or gentle giant.  Here in California, there has been a special committee in place since sometime in the sixties, to help this particular elephant remain content and docile.
What do the six blind individuals “see” when they encounter this elephant?  The first to approach has “eyes” only for the dimensions of the four mighty tree trunks that hold the elephant upright.  He/she encircles the lower leg as it attaches to the foot, and concludes that this behemoth is dangerous and must be confined away, out of our sight, never to be a threat in any way, shape or form.  Many people never get past this one element of the elephant.  “We must protect the children.”
The second approaches this same beast, but she/he is a youth, in the prime of shape, and encircles the colossus excitedly, eventually clawing her/his way to the top, and moving around quite comfortably as the elephant tolerates this intrusion placidly.  The climber stands high atop the elephant, and crows, “This is too sick, man.  How can I get ahold of some of this shit?”
The third has heard many fables about the good that has been derived in the past by native peoples, and seeks to investigate the medicinal attributes of this elephant.  Whether utilizing the tusks, the oils, or any other aspect of the elephant, there is abundant reason to rejoice.  Overwhelmed by the unlimited  applicative elements, which provide relief for a gamut of maladies, ranging from physical, to mental, emotional, and psychological, this person comes away from the elephant claiming that the elephant must be available to the community because so many people benefit.  “We would be fools to ignore that this is nature’s way of telling us we do not need corporate America’s assistance when it comes to “healing ourselves.”
The fourth is an elder, from the old school, and notes that there are many components of the elephant that can be used in a pragmatic manner around the village, once the elephant has passed on to the great stockade in the sky.  “Why should we ignore all of the positive qualities, just because some people are afraid of the size and strength of this creature?  We need to regulate these benefits and tax them, so that the state can also be on the receiving end of revenue.”
The fifth is a holy person and has experienced the soul-stirring advantages of being able to include the elephant in the religious expression of his faith.  He finds that the elephant provides an umbrella of serenity over his faith, and serves as a salve for matters pertaining to the abrasions of the flesh.  “Without the elephant, the members of my church would be depressed, anxiety-ridden or just plain, in pain.”
The last heard all of the arguments, investigated the elephant from every angle, and walked away saying, “Whatever, Dude.”  Unfortunately, there are a lot of these people in the last category, so sometimes it’s a few people making a lot of racket, that get these people swayed one way or another.
“What does all of this have to do with the Salon?” you may be asking.  It’s easy to answer the question, but will take more time than what I have today, so I will address the question, from one angle, tomorrow.  As with all things elephant, the issues are cumbersome, pervading and frequently overwhelming.  Better to open this particular door in the wall gingerly, lest we frighten the visitors away.
 

5 comments:

  1. Well I am guessing that the elephant is cannabis. Something that I have never tried, have never even been around another person who was using it in any form. I couldn't identify it by taste, touch, or even smell. My youngest son has been experiencing panic attacks recently. He told me that he thinks he should start smoking pot. Who knows? I don't have an opinion one way or another. I don't know enough about it.
    But what made me think that your subject is marijuana was your opening line, the lyric by Paul McCartney. I understand that he is giving up smoking grass because he wants to be a responsible adult around his 8 year old daughter. I wonder if at age 69, after years and years of writing the most incredible music, he is giving up his Muse?

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  2. As always, a great piece of writing, Mark. You take weed and show all the different views in a way that makes them all make sense. I am looking forward to tomorrow's piece.
    And, Lynda, I wonder about Paul and his muse too. I suspect his muse is still present but he may have to work harder for her to emerge.

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  3. I only put the reference to California grass, because of the double entendre. I will follow up with more on this subject in upcoming days.

    JT, thanks. "Weed," another moniker for this plant. "Pot" is the most prevalent one. I prefer the use of "reefer" myself, an offshoot of the 1930's film, "Reefer Madness," I am certain.

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  4. There was some interesting debate on the topic on Chris Hayes' show this morning. With the limited funding our economy has, where do we want to spend our money? How many people are we willing to incarcerate?

    The two segments were: What prohibition costs and Is the war on drugs worth waging?
    http://upwithchrishayes.msnbc.msn.com/

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  5. "Oh give me a home,
    Like the Fine Line Salon,
    Where the Elephants roam,
    And...er...uh..
    Everyone can talk about them respectfully with one another."

    Why I write prose, in a nutshell. Anyway, looking forward to the angles on this particular pachyderm.

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