Dozer, the bulldog

Dozer, the bulldog
Dozer: He was the best dog on the planet.

Bonding

Bonding
The author of Mark's Work with Ellie Mae

Guess who's coming for dinner

Guess who's coming for dinner
Blue heron, sitting on the dock of our pond

HappyDay Farms bees are happy bees.

HappyDay Farms bees are happy bees.
Air-borne bees

BFF's forever

BFF's forever
Margie and Ellie Mae

Tomatoes and peppers are us.

Tomatoes and peppers are us.
Spicy salsa with roasted peppers, here at HappyDay Farms

Much love, John-Bryan

Much love, John-Bryan
Eric at 26 on the left, and John-Bryan in January of 1973.

Halloween fun

Halloween fun
SmallBoy and Dancing Girl

Our house

Our house
The snow season approaches...

Mahlon Masling Blue

Mahlon Masling Blue
My friend and brother.

Mark's E-mail address

bellspringsmark@gmail.com

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Entirely Elephant

Entirely Elephant
Our writing community is like a social club, whose saloon-style doors are always unlocked.  I often stop in at the lounge, at the most extraordinary times, without conversing with anyone, simply flitting from one personality to another, taking in words at each site, and dashing home to reflect on them.  I often visit, sample, and retreat, contemplating what I have encountered, and letting it drift around inside the expansive sawdust repository, which comprises my brain.
All that sawdust mixes with the more substantial fodder gathered from my journeys, and combines to form tangible evidence on the monitor in front of me.  Words jump out at me in black on white, and I await to see what has transpired.
The other morning I arrived back, simply thrumming inside from a new word I had encountered.  I find it as provocative to meet a new word, as I would to have a new follower join my site.  Admittedly I can accommodate far more words, than I can followers.  With followers come certain pleasurable responsibilities, while with words, comes nothing but the pleasure.  
I am sure I have encountered “thrum” in the past; I just do not recall.  “Thrumming thunder” has such an alliterative/onomatopoetic melody to it, I positively chortle in my appreciation for its tone and timbre.  The phrase came out of a piece written by Suzanne, that resonated with the music of our language to which I have alluded in the past.  I marveled at the piece which contained this phrase, even if I couldn’t intelligently comment on it.  It was enough to come away from this particular wordhoard, clutching a new treasure, with the same tenacity with which Lynda latches onto a new-to-her auction piece.
Back at home I will display my new phrase on the mantelpiece, examine it, maybe test drive it, insert it somewhere in my writing, run it up the flagpole, and see if anyone salutes it.

I do not even worry about the etiquette of borrowing dynamic words, phrases or ideas from the sites I visit, because the response is always so overwhelmingly positive.  Each of us, who communicates exclusively via words, must use this same tool to determine approval or support.  When I piggy-backed on Suzanne’s interest in verification words, to post a piece of fluff on my interest in these letter-groupings, I did not worry that she would object.  She has mentioned in the past that she is “honored” to have an idea or phrase acknowledged. 
I feel the same, should something I mentioned rear its pointed head, in another’s post.  That’s why the discussion this morning, encountered first at Masked Mom’s site, but originating at Word Nerd’s site, is so fascinating to me.  The ongoing discussion of etiquette within blog sites is of interest, because we are still trying to determine what the parameters are, and if they are the same for everyone.
I see bloggers with ten times the followers as I have, and I realize that it is easy to cross over into a different league, one that I sit in the stands for only, preferring to follow the action from a safe distance.  I am also cautious about commenting on sites, until I am certain that there are enough commonalities to warrant my further participation.  I am not interested in quantity; I am interested in quality.  
I feel that if I am a regular visitor to a site, that I can then do any of three or more options: visit, investigate and move on to reflect; visit, comment and move on; or visit, comment and return to see how it all worked out.  Because I have more flexibility than anyone else (I believe), I have this luxury.  I also have the luxury of being able to write, pretty much any time I want, day or night.

 Of course, I enjoy receiving comments, but never worry if any given day's response seems lackluster, because I know people have real lives, and because I have always written, first and foremost, for my own enjoyment.  Comments do not validate my writing; they complement it.

I do work in the house, both maintaining the upkeep, and being gainfully employed, but there are no time restrictions involving when, or how much time, I must work.  It’s all up to “Bill,” who presents himself incessantly when I stop in at the post office.
My desire to write and be acknowledged, has been met with phenomenal success.  As the dialogue about etiquette continues, with input from many, I will monitor closely.  Meanwhile, my affair with words thrums onward, thundering forward like an elephant, finally released from its stockade.

11 comments:

  1. Okay, this morning, you conjured up quite a scene for me. Swinging doors, boots and spurs, shoot out at the O.K. coral. But instead of poker games and chips, pistols and quick draws, we challenge each other with thought provoking, emotion evoking, image producing, and often just at the right time, how did you ever know I needed that fuzzy comforting words.
    And, my my, I must say, Sir, you do have a way with words.

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  2. You reinforce what I just said. If I have a way with words, it's due in part because I have a "little help from my friends." Thanks, Lynda, for these and past words. Writing doesn't eliminate pain, but does provide a salve for the salt that often is poured into the wounds by life's experiences.

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  3. I love the line, "Comments do not validate my writing; they complement it." That is it exactly! I write becuase I have to, want to, need to, and getting feedback is a bonus. I feel very blessed with every comment, but even when a post doesn't elicit a response, that is okay with me. I liked writing it and that's what really matters.

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  4. You always make me think - - and sometimes reach for my dictionary. But I love reading your posts, and I come back every single day to see what you are going to make me think about that day!

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  5. That's what I'm say/talking about, Michelle: "I liked writing it, and that's what really matters." Bottom line.

    And Judy? High praise, indeed. I can only assure you it is a mutually beneficial arrangement.

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  6. You know, you have a real life too, dude. It might be a bit more convenient to write at any time (okay, so a lot more convenient) but it IS a real life. And I always look forward to reading your posts (and emails) - xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoox

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  7. Words, words and more words.........these are the tools we use to express ourselves and articulate our needs and concerns. We describe our world and experiences via this wonderful craft, and we are all better off for it. On a different track, i will add another dimension. There are areas in our beautiful existence that are beyond words. In the realm of intuition or mysticism, as soon as we try to dice these worlds up in words they simply evaporate. It is impossible to say in words that which is numinous. So, we simply enjoy the feeling and allow the mind to rest. Great post Markus!

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  8. JT: I have a real life, sure, just not so filled with challenges as it used to be. My youngest son is 26, and I have no "boss" and no "clock."

    And just because Judy mentioned dictionaries, I had to get mine out to look up "numinous." (I thought it was supposed to be luminous.) It means "having a strong religious or spiritual quality; indicating or suggesting the presence of a divinity." That is a sentiment that has been expressed: Spiritual matters are so expansive that there is huge leeway for settling into a niche (or cavern) that works for each individual. Tolerance is the cornerstone of our writing foundation. hanks, Noeli.

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  9. Hey there! I don't know how I missed this earlier. I am, again, honored that one of my silly phrases caught your eye. I am new to the whole blog world too and I fear I break etiquette all the time online much as I do in person.
    I, like you, am content with the sidelines. Being able to write every day is a luxury I guard closely and comments add extra sparkle. But to have a wordsmith like yourself take a shine to one of my baubles is just downright decadence. Thank you.

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  10. This is a thoughtful post (as always) on a topic that has been making the rounds. I definitely agree that the comments are a bonus to the main purpose, which is the writing for me as well. I have been blogging (sometimes sporadically, but I have never stopped completely) for seven years this May. There have been whole stretches of time when there were few or no comments, but I've been unable to walk away completely from the "form" that is blogging.

    And, as I've already blathered on at length, I've been delighted and surprised by this growing community that is the side effect of that writing/blogging I've been compelled to keep doing.

    PS--"Bill" and I are quite well acquainted, but I wouldn't call him a friend. If you know what I mean. ;)

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  11. I like that, Suzanne, "take a shine to one of my baubles," and will have to remember that.

    And Masked Mom, who doesn't appreciate the Spiral Notebook, and the manner in which history will repeat itself, if you keep track? Remembering what has come earlier, helps us from duplicating it.

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